Market Researcher’s Need a Pitch

I am awake and it is the middle of the night and I can’t sleep. I have a question. What is a Pitch?

Google defined it so, as a noun, it is a form of words used to persuade someone to buy or accept something, and as a verb, it is defined as a set or aim at a particular level, target or audience.

Sales pitch, business pitch, video pitch, etc are the phrases that have arisen from the word pitch to simply represent concise verbal manifestation used to represent a product or business plan in a positive light to a person or people with the intention of selling the product to them or to attract investments.

What a successful pitch does is that it starts one on a journey, if not for the listener then for the speaker. It initiates something that would usually result in an exchange or a transaction.

Why am I doing this in the middle of the night?

Though the art of the pitch is ingrained in the world of sales, the word is not necessarily limited to sales and business development domain.

Researcher’s pitch is an essential assistance that acts as an integral tool used to successfully persuade people to spend 15 minutes speaking with the researcher. In a world that teaches people time is money, one needs to be persuasive in getting people to be interviewed. This is more so in the case of B2B researchers as the number of potential samples for interviews are usually limited.

This is because every business is different, and every project that arises due to unique challenges faced by the business will also be different. As a result, a B2B researcher will only have a small pool of people to take as a sample.

Mark Towery in his book Quirks Marketing Research review says -“The more industrial the project’s focus, the less likely you are to find a panel or even a directory of qualified targets”.

Multiply this by the fact that a group will be needed to come to a decision in a company which would probably be spread through the different hierarchical position in the organization. And higher the tier of the position they hold busier they will be and lower the position they hold lessen the chance they may be able to give information due to regulations and need for permission.

In essence, each member with whom a researcher can contact needs to be impressed or persuaded to share their knowledge with the researcher.

One can be persuasive by giving monetary rewards but that could simply rocket the cost of research and in many situations providing the decision makers of organizations with monetary rewards will appear dubious.

So one needs to have the right approach and in this case the right pitch especially when the first contact with the person is made through a phone. From my experience in telephonic conversation, one needs to sound enthusiastic and confident. And a pitch well prepared helps one to appear confident and enthusiastic.

As for the right pitch.. hmmm…?

A sales pitch is a line of talk that attempts to persuade someone or something, with a planned sales presentation strategy of a product or service designed to initiate and close a sale of the product or service.

Similarly, a researcher’s pitch is a line of talk that attempts to persuade a particular person, with knowledge about the research product or service being designed to solve a challenge faced by an organization or knowledge on the challenge itself so as to be able to get an interview with the person.

As for the right pitch, it would start the listener or the speaker on a journey, which would result in an exchange of knowledge between them.

Ugh lost track of time. It’s already a new day with a new morning and someone out there must be giving a right pitch for the right research. Good day.

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